Gemstones on a marble slab

Countless unique items

Created over millions of years in the depths of the earth

Gemstones

Gemstones

For the creation of gemstones, our earth needs many millions of years.

For the most part, gemstones are found in regions that are difficult to access. People who are looking for such treasures are often exposed to the greatest dangers and hardships, in the hope of making a profitable discovery.

But if it happens every now and then that nature reveals one of its secrets, we should be aware of what we can hold or carry in our hands. In doing so, we will find out that every stone, present in a piece of jewellery or left as a mineral in its originality, is unique.

Aquamarine

Aquamarin

Santa Maria

We grew up with the aquamarine, our signature gemstone.

The blue variety of the beryl group is distinguished by its high degree of hardness (7.5 to 8) and covers all blues, from glacier blue to deep sea blue. The most precious colouring is the famous, deep blue Santa Maria, which gets its name through the mine of the same name in Ceará, Brazil.

Africa
Africa
Brazil
Brazil
Spinel

Spinel

Red Spinel · Pink Spinel · Red Spinel

With a hardness of 8, the spinel is one of the hardest coloured gemstones. It occurs in different colour variants, of which the red spinel is the most valuable. 

For a long time, the centre stone of the Imperial State Crown of the United Kingdom was thought to be a ruby. However, this is actually a spinel, which thanks to this finding came into the spotlight.

Myanmar
Myanmar
Vietnam
Vietnam
Tanzania
Tanzania
Tajikistan
Tajikistan

Beryl

Beryl

Vanadium Beryl · Yellow Beryl · Green Beryl · Red Beryl · Morganite

The beryl, found mainly in Africa and Brazil, occurs in almost all pastel tones.

Among the best-known varieties of the beryl are the green emerald, the yellow gold beryl, the pink morganite and also our signature gemstone, the blue aquamarine.

Afrika
Afrika
Brasilien
Brasilien
Tourmaline

Tourmaline

Paraíba · Rubellite · Mint Green Tourmaline · Green Tourmaline · Pink Tourmaline · Brown Tourmaline · Multicolour Tourmaline · Chromium Tourmaline

The group of tourmaline gemstones is characterised above all by its unique colour diversity.

Tourmalines occur in two – or even three – colour varieties and have a perfectly crystallized triangular shape which makes them very difficult to process. One of the most expensive versions, which has gained importance in recent years, is the Paraiba tourmaline from the Brazilian state of the same name.

Africa
Africa
Brazil
Brazil
Afghanistan
Afghanistan

Citrine

Citrine

Madeira Citrine · Palmeira Citrine

Like the amethyst, the citrine belongs to the quartz gemstones and is one of the most valuable representatives of this group, especially as Madeira citrine.

Its name is derived from the Latin citrus for lemon because of its colour: the citrine is available in yellow colours, from lemon yellow to orange gold.

Africa
Africa
South America
South America
Tanzanite

Tanzanite

Tanzania

A handful of gemstone lapidaries from Idar-Oberstein, including Arnoldi, marketed tanzanite in the late 1960s to the New York jeweller Tiffany’s, which made the stone famous.

The unique, deep-blue tanzanite is only found in Tanzania and is characterised by its trichroism in its natural form.

Tanzania
Tanzania
Chrysoberyl

Chrysoberyl

Alexandrite · Cat eye

The lesser known neon-coloured version of the chrysoberyl is a fascination by itself. The alexandrite changes colour: under natural light it shines green but under artificial light it shines red.

Despite its name, the chrysoberyl does not belong to the beryl group, and is characterised by its high hardness of 8.5. Its radiant brilliance makes it an instant eye-catcher.

Brazil
Brazil
Africa
Africa
Russia
Russia
Ceylon
Ceylon
Peridot

Peridot

One of the few gemstones that only occur naturally in green is peridot.

The extraordinary colouring of the spring stone, which was first found on St. John Island in Egypt, has made it an instant celebrity to this day.

Norway
Norway
North America
North America
Africa
Africa
Pakistan
Pakistan
Amethyst

Amethyst

Ametrine

The amethyst stands for Idar-Oberstein: in the beginning, the amethyst was a main pillar of the gemstone business in Idar-Oberstein.

The violet stone is one of the most popular varieties of quartz, not least because it shines under a strong colour, which otherwise only other more expensive stones offer.

Africa
Africa
South America
South America
Garnet

Garnet

Demantoid · Tsavorite · Mali Garnet · Mandarin Garnet · Rhodolite · Red Garnet · Hessonite · Spessartite

The garnet is particularly impressive for its intense, strong and dark colours.

The high light refraction of the gemstone creates an extraordinary brilliance in all colour shades. Hubert Arnoldi was one of the pioneers that introduced the Mandarin garnet to the market.

Africa
Africa